Nouveau scénario, des hordes d'ennemis, une puissance de feu respectable et l'Arizona comme décor. Bonus : un nouveau mode de jeu.
Évaluations des utilisateurs : Plutôt positive (2,747 évaluation(s)) - 74% des 2,747 évaluations des utilisateurs pour ce jeu sont positives.
Date de parution: 22 mai 2012

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Acheter Alan Wake's American Nightmare

Soldes d'automne ! Fin de l'offre : 1 décembre


Packages qui comprennent ce jeu

Acheter Alan Wake Franchise

Inclut les 3 articles suivants : Alan Wake, Alan Wake's American Nightmare, Alan Wake Collector's Edition Extras

Soldes d'automne ! Fin de l'offre : 1 décembre


Recommandé par les curateurs

"Alan Wake could never overstay his welcome, especially when his doppelganger evil-doer Mr. Scratch tags along."
Lire la critique complète ici.

Steam Big Picture

À propos de ce jeu

Dans ce tout nouvel opus, Alan Wake affronte le héraut des ténèbres, le malfaisant M. Grincement ! Nouvelle trame captivante, hordes d'ennemis effroyables, puissance de feu redoutable et décors sublimes en Arizona, plus un nouveau mode aussi amusant que retors font de ce jeu un indispensable pour les vétérans d'Alan Wake et un tremplin tout indiqué pour les néophytes !

Caractéristiques :

  • Jouez au mode campagne : lancez-vous dans une lutte sans merci contre votre clone assassin pour regagner votre vie... et réécrire la réalité !
  • Mode arcade "Battez-vous jusqu'à l'aube" : Dans ce mode arcade bourré d'action, vous devrez maîtriser le combat à la torche pour résister jusqu'à l'aube et battre vos amis aux classements. Saurez-vous survivre jusqu'à l'aurore ?
  • Faites face aux ténèbres : Des ennemis dangereux et tourmentés vous traquent dans la pénombre. Réexpédiez-les en enfer grâce au puissant arsenal d'armes à votre disposition.

Configuration requise

    Minimum :
    • Système d'exploitation : Windows XP SP2
    • Processeur : Dual Core 2GHz Intel ou 2,8GHz AMD
    • Mémoire vive : 2 Go de RAM
    • Affichage : DirectX 10 compatible avec 512Mo de RAM
    • DirectX® : 10
    • Disque dur : 8 Go d'espace disque disponible
    • Son : DirectX 9.0c compatible
    Recommandée :
    • Système d'exploitation :Windows 7
    • Processeur :Quad Core 2.66GHz Intel ou 3.2GHz AMD
    • Mémoire vive :4 Go RAM
    • Affichage :DirectX 10 compatible ou plus ancien avec 1Go RAM
    • DirectX® :10
    • Disque dur :8 Go d'espace libre
    • Son :DirectX 9.0c compatible
Évaluations intéressantes des utilisateurs
21 personne(s) sur 21 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
4 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
40.5 heures en tout
Posté le : 31 octobre
Picture this, if you will, gentle reader; a man plunged into a twisted nightmare of his own design. Stalked by otherworldly horrors and mocked by his dark twin, the embodiment of the worst in him, the man must unlock the secrets of enlightenment or be doomed to repeat his mistakes again and again in his shrouded vision of strange goings on in rural America, made flesh. Did you picture it? Because that’s Alan Wake’s American Nightmare; a brazen send up of The Twilight Zone from the perspective of its hapless writer.

Having not played the previous Alan Wake, American Nightmare would have to serve as an introduction to Alan’s world, and as a standalone adventure, it’s very accessible. There are some vague references to the events of the prequel, but AN can be picked up without any confusion. American Nightmare comes across a little bit like an inverse Max Payne, which is not hugely surprising, considering Remedy made them both. Even some of the stock “this door is locked!” sound effects are recognisable as the same, which isn’t to say the two titles are carbon copies, because they’re closer to distorted mirror images, aptly enough.

Unlike Max Payne, Alan’s not an ex-CIA genetically engineered astronaut cowboy; he’s a writer. Or so he likes to keep telling everybody. He does precious little actual writing, unless you count the rewriting of reality, and even then he plays it safe by working off his old hits.

While Max Payne was about gratuitous slow motion gun play, AN is about frantic torch shining and panicky self defence. Whereas Max Payne had surreal Twin Peak-esque horror lurking on the fringes through blurry TV sets, and the funny as hell, worst thing I can think of drug fuelled delusions of Max’s entrapment in his own narrative, these things take centre stage as Alan Wake really is trapped in a fictional world of his own devising, while his evil mirror image runs amok in the real world, the real world as we know it being snippets of radio shows and TV clips, courtesy of the murderous doppelganger channel.

Despite Alan’s insistence at being a writer, his tools of the trade seem to be less the pen, and more the gun and torch. With this in mind, much of the game’s tension comes from Alan’s lack of superhuman abilities; he can’t effortlessly evade bullets, getting out of the way of danger is hard and takes precision. Nor is Alan a killing machine. His greatest weapon might just be the light, his trusty torch being the bane of The Taken; the darkness infused menagerie of slasher movie caricatures and monster mash clichés that really don’t like Alan’s annoying habit of having a pulse.

The Taken, as avatars of darkness, hate the light, and this light vs. dark conflict is central to American Nightmare. In fact the ideas of motifs and symbols themselves are central to American Nightmare.So when Mr. Wake uses his miraculous ability to focus his torch’s beam, The Taken stop dead in their tracks, unless something untoward occurs, like the fiends splitting in half, which is most ungentlemanly. That The Taken need to be exorcised of the darkness protecting them before they can be dealt with adds a clever twist; the only thing standing between you and undiluted evil is an AAA battery.

Having this everyday item be the only thing keeping death at bay is an effective vehicle for ramping up the pressure as it plays on and prolongs anticipation of the conflict, which is classic horror movie fare. AN excels at creating these back to the wall, dead end scenarios, where the pressure is steadily piled on, as Alan is encircled by mobs intent on redecorating the great outdoors with his insides.

It’s not so easy for Alan to outrun them, though he may find shelter in one of the various rejuvenating street lamps, fonts of light that they are. If Max Payne is John Woo, then Alan Wake is John Carpenter (minus all the synths), and American Nightmare absolutely nails the horror movie atmosphere of the relentless supernatural force bearing down on the stubborn everyman, with the only thing protecting him being some flimsy mystical rules.

American Nightmare isn’t outright scary, but it is stressful in a perversely enjoyable sort of way, and competently eerie. This eerie nature is due to a mix of deserted locales, the tense combat situations that constantly threaten to pop up, and the convincingly acted aforementioned video diary from Mr. Scratch, the bad Alan. For all its serial killer bravado and fear of the dark, American Nightmare’s most unsettling aspect is how subversive it is.

Part of the game revolves around finding manuscripts, each entry shedding more light on the story, which neatly justifies the hunt for them. The earnest journal entries tend to be more engaging than Alan’s purple prose, and the implications that maybe he’s not actually that great a writer, until the line starts to blur between fact and fiction within the narrative, which in a completely organic way, questions the nature of sentience, reality, free will and fate, and even the role of fiction.

American Nightmare features some deceptively excellent writing which dawns on the player as a revelation through the barely concealed s♥♥♥♥♥♥s of the narrator’s periodical spiel about champions of light and how ‘this could be anywhere in America’.

Mechanically, AN isn’t very complex, but it is both tense and engaging. The ‘puzzles’ if you can dare call them that, seeing as there’s no actual puzzling to be had beyond ‘push button until solved’, are basically exercises in connecting Alan’s occupation to in game activities. They work thematically, but they aren’t challenging. Even the scavenger hunt for manuscripts is sign posted when you get nearby. The only real challenge in terms of the game itself is the combat, which is helpfully extended into Arcade Mode, a last stand survival mode at one of multiple classic horror movie locations, and the source of lots of replayability.

Though it might be seen as hand holding, American Nightmare doesn’t want you to get frustrated exploring for paper, just like it doesn’t want you to get annoyed with overly confusing puzzles. It wants you to experience its story, it wants you to be engaged by its concepts, and it wants you to be drawn into its world (so your evil double can take your place).

Alan Wake’s American Nightmare is massively repetitive. It’s repetitive. Repetitive. But that’s not a bad thing! American Nightmare is centred around a very tightly honed combat design and central motifs that are introduced, reintroduced and then exploded. Events never let up, and AN is paced without hesitation and only gains momentum as it progresses. There’s really very little time to even think about getting sick of proceedings. Its repetition is central to its theme and is never monotonous.

It doesn’t hurt that the gun play is extremely well realised, with each weapon feeling distinctive, and even, dare it be said, approaching realism. The animation also, bar the occasional ‘I’m looking at the ceiling’ conversation standby is great. Overall, American Nightmare is highly polished, with a consistently good quality in everything it does. It’s not the deepest game out there, but it strikes an admirable balance between cerebral thematic content and a pinpoint focus on action and atmosphere and the relationship between the two.

American Nightmare doesn’t hang around, but it doesn’t need to either. Judge this book by its cover; just make sure the cover you’re thinking of is an Americana doused, enjoyably knowing schlock-fest, with a surprising philosophic tinge.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
59 personne(s) sur 87 (68%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
16 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
3.1 heures en tout
Posté le : 8 septembre
Alan Wake's American Nightmare - после событий с первой части прошло целых два года и Алану так и не удалось выбраться из Тёмной Обители. Теперь он попадает в город «Найт Спрингс» и ему вновь предстоит сразить армию злых дядек с топорами, ножами и пилами, но к этому всему добавляются ужасные пауки, которые несмотря ни на что, даже на свет, напрыгивают на вас. Но на этот раз у него будет арсенал лучше! Добавили много разных огнестрельных стволов, с которыми стало гораздо проще уничтожать своих противников. Конечно же здесь есть свой сюжет, но он очень короткий, но игрушка может похвастаться аркадным режимом, где вам нужно выстоять против кучки врагов до рассвета за определенное время. А так же в каждой видюшке можно услышать хорошую музыку, которая вам должна обязательно понравиться.
Рекомендую брать игрушку по скидке, так как уж больно короткая, но лично меня она заинтересовала.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
40 personne(s) sur 57 (70%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
4 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
3.6 heures en tout
Posté le : 23 juin
I don't understand why this game is so highly rated. The game is repetitive (you basically have to replay the game 3x as part of the story), and the voice acting and writing are horrible. Seriously, isn't Alan Wake supposed to be a writer? The dialogue in this game is laughably bad. The story is very weak, and doesn't add much to the original. The atmosphere of this game isn't anything like Alan Wake. The original had plenty of moments keeping you on the edge of your seat; this one isn't frightening at all. For how good Alan Wake was, this one is that bad. Save your time and money and do not get this game.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
12 personne(s) sur 13 (92%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
3.8 heures en tout
Posté le : 1 septembre
The original 'Alan Wake' game was one of the most unique single-player experiences I ever had. The story was compelling, the characters were original, and the gameplay was quite inventive. If you're looking for these things in 'American Nightmare', I say: look elsewhere, or simply replay 'Alan Wake'. In this sequel, you follow Alan through a series of dreamlike sequences, and fans of the Jake Gyllenhaal films 'Donnie Darko' or 'Enemy' will be familiar with the ground covered in this game. Unsurprisingly, repeating and attempting to rewrite reality isn't quite as fun in videogame form, and so 'American Nightmare' very quickly degenerates into several hours of mindless repetition. The handful of characters accompanying Alan Wake in this game are incredibly uninteresting, and so the dialogue scenes really aren't worth sitting through. The developers seem to attempt livening the game up with a number of additions in the weapon and enemy departments, but these, again, aren't anything special. I'd only recommend this to: (a) people who've replayed 'Alan Wake' dozens of times, and are lifelong devotees of the character, and (b) people who spot this game massively reduced (i.e. £1 or less).
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9 personne(s) sur 12 (75%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
4.9 heures en tout
Posté le : 7 août
Alan Wake's American Nightmare is the second part of very good and addictive game, but not the same in terms of the plot, as his predecessor. In my opinion, the game is very good, but is too short. During the game, we do practically the same actions and we visit the same locations 3 times in a row. Graphically, the game is the same as the previous part of the game. In the second part we have more weapons, and about a lot more enemies. The game has an interesting ending, but not as cool as in the first part of the game. My rating 8/10.
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