Du kan inte rädda hela världen. Den kommer att slukas av en mytisk demon med fiskhuvud. Men som en docka som absorberar allt den rör vid kan du försöka rädda så mycket av jordens storhet som möjligt innan det är för sent. Till att börja med rör du dig över hela världen och kan endast absorbera de allra minsta objekten.
Användarrecensioner: Mest positivt (438 recensioner) - 73% av 438 användarrecensioner för det här spelet är positiva.
Utgivningsdatum: 25 jan, 2008

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Köp The Wonderful End of the World

Paket som innehåller detta spel

Köp AaaaaAAaaaAAA!!! + The Wonderful End of the World

Innehåller 2 saker: AaAaAA!!! - A Reckless Disregard for Gravity, The Wonderful End of the World

 

Om detta spel

Du kan inte rädda hela världen. Den kommer att slukas av en mytisk demon med fiskhuvud. Men som en docka som absorberar allt den rör vid kan du försöka rädda så mycket av jordens storhet som möjligt innan det är för sent.

Till att börja med rör du dig över hela världen och kan endast absorbera de allra minsta objekten. En glaskula du plockar med dig blir ditt huvud och ett par gelégodisar blir dina händer. Små varelser är farliga för dig. Råttor sparkar dig runt och Golden retriever-hundar hotar att trampa ihjäl dig. Men för varje föremål du samlar på dig blir din docka allt större. Till slut är du en jättevarelse med brandbilar till armar och kapacitet att absorbera hela byggnader.

The Wonderful End of the World tar dig genom 12 unika platser, och det finns över tusen skatter du kan samla på dig innan det är för sent. Sno lite godis från godisbutiken där geléfiskar simmar i en blåbärsflod, besök ett surrealistiskt bibliotek där orden faktiskt har rymt ur böckerna och utforska Megalopolis, där du kan se en livlig världen-är-över-parad innan du slukar den och fortsätter mot den högsta skyskrapan som någonsin byggts.

  • 10 framsteg för att utforska och låsa upp hemliga områden i spelet.
  • 12 unika platser att utforska.
  • 3 spellägen: Timed, Timeless och Exploration.
  • 16 snabba musikspår rockar spelet framåt. Och det svänger ordentligt.

Systemkrav

    • Operativsystem: Windows 2000/XP/Vista
    • Processor: 1,5 GHz
    • Minne: 1 GB
    • Grafik: DX9-kompatibelt 3D-grafikkort
    • DirectX-version: 9.0c
    • Ljud: DX9-kompatibelt ljudkort
    • Hårddisk: 220 MB
Hjälpsamma kundrecensioner
16 av 17 personer (94%) fann denna recension hjälpsam
16.3 timmar totalt
Upplagd: 18 januari
In an industry that's dominated by major corporations and never-ending strings of blockbuster sequels, it's great to run into a fun, imaginative game from a smaller company. The Wonderful End of the World from Dejobaan Games, certainly fits this description. It looks good, plays well, and has a great soundtrack. And it gives you the chance to play a walking collection of houses. Or buses. Or any other object that you can scoop up and make a part of your ever-growing body.

The premise is a simple one, and one that console gamers that have played Katamari Damacy will be familiar with. The world is about to end, and it's up to the player to grab and save as much stuff as possible before it's all lost. That's it. There is no plot that progresses from one level to the next. Instead, each level is a wildly different, wildly decorated environment that presents lots and lots of collectible stuff ranging from the appropriate to the absurd. A backyard area has lawn chairs and shrubs and a lawn mower - all stuff you might find in an average back yard. The neighbor's yard, however, features a group of what look to be orangutans and chimpanzees seated at dining room tables. The centerpiece of the same yard involves Lassie presiding in a Stonehenge made of old cars. Other levels are just as fun and take their inspiration from things like Candyland, a coffee house, and your local mall. There's even a great level that's based on classic arcade games, including Pong, Centipede, and Tron, just to name a few.

A big chunk of the Wonderful fun lies in exploring all those locations, but the challenge comes from the attempt to accumulate all that stuff as quickly as possible and the player's size is the key. When a level starts, you're just a little bugger, able to grab things like coffee cups and books. Walk over any of these and they become part of the conglomeration of clutter that is your body: a walking pile of trees, lamp posts, baseball bats and whatever else you happened to collect. And as all this stuff sticks to you, you gain bulk and the ability to gather larger and larger objects, until skyscrapers and ships are sucked into your gravitational field.

This 'junk puppet' is one of the game's major technical achievements. The heap of objects appears to have arms and legs made up of recently-collected stuff. And as you grow, the game does a nice job of keeping the camera in scale with you. At first it's nearly at ground-level as you collect flowers and butterflies, and it grows out to a bird's-eye-view as you tower over whole neighborhoods. Occasionally, though, it's possible to get stuck in an area because you grew just enough to make it tough to exit but not enough to absorb the object blocking your way.

Part of the challenge is learning what you can and can't absorb at any given time. Since you've got to rack up as many collections as possible in a set time, you can't afford to waste precious seconds bouncing off objects that aren't your size yet. You've got to keep moving and keep collecting so that you grow large enough to start grabbing people, cars, buses, and rack up a score that counts in the billions.

While Wonderful End of the World probably falls into what's often called the 'casual game' category, that doesn't mean that it isn't challenging. It gives you eleven different main levels to run, and at the end of each, it hands out letter grades, all the way up to A+. If you get at least an A on every level the game unlocks a bonus level. This is easier said than done - after plenty of trying, I'm still working to earn that twelfth level. Although the main missions will take you only a few hours to clear if you're persistent, there's replay value in the game modes unlocked once all eleven standard levels are cleared. For one, you get a reverse-timed mode where the clock counts up and scores you on how long it takes you to clear all the items from a level. And you also get a free exploration mode that allows you to go through the whole level and see all there is to see without the pressure of a clock or score.

If there's a down side to Wonderful End of the World, it's the fact that the gameplay stays essentially the same from one level to the next. Once you've figured out how to maneuver, the challenge lies in finding the best path through a level, the one where you can keep grabbing and growing without wasting any time. This makes each level a challenge in its own right, but it means that you're basically doing the same thing throughout. Still, it's always a pleasure to finally grow to Godzilla size at the end of a level and start rolling up the objects by the dozen.

On the tech side of things, The Wonderful End of the World is a very stable game. The only issue I had was a little bit of camera craziness now and again. As I negotiated some tight corners, my vision might get blocked for a few seconds, but nothing bad enough to keep me from getting where I was going.

The Wonderful End of the World has everything going for it. It's a fun game with a distinctive look and a fun soundtrack. It's a bit short, but the levels are replayable as you try to unlock the bonus level or try for perfect A+ grades across the board. And developer Dejobaan is no newcomer to the games biz - their gameography stretches back to 1999 with a couple of titles released almost every year. Browse their catalog, and you'll find one beautiful game after another, each with a hook that'll have you downloading the demo to see what it's all about. With The Wonderful End of the World as an example of what Dejobaan Games can do, I'm looking forward to playing other games made by them.
Var denna recension hjälpsam? Ja Nej Rolig
6 av 6 personer (100%) fann denna recension hjälpsam
3.2 timmar totalt
Upplagd: 26 september, 2015
Kinda like the Katamari series, except you walk around absorbing stuff instead of rolling a ball.
Perfected in 2 hours. I liked it, get it if it's on sale.
Var denna recension hjälpsam? Ja Nej Rolig
5 av 5 personer (100%) fann denna recension hjälpsam
1 person tyckte att den här recensionen var rolig
3.2 timmar totalt
Upplagd: 5 oktober, 2015
I've never played any of the Katamari Damacy games, but having seen and heard much about them I knew I really wanted to try them out for myself. Sadly, there's no new games being released in the franchise and no way for PC players to get their hands on the originals. The good news is, someone else has stepped up to fill the void.

They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, if that's true then this game is seriously flattering the sh*t out of the Katamari Damacy games. But it at least doesn't feel like it's doing it in a gross or cynical way, more like paying tribute or homage to something well-loved and inspirational, making a game that they themselves would want to play and trying to maybe put their own mark on it in some small way. There seems to be a lot of controversy among the community over this fact, over how much is a true display of appreciation and how much is pure shameless rip-off. But strange as it may sound, ultimately, I don't think it really matters all that much here. It's fun and it's not stepping on anyone else's toes, so what's the problem?

Anyway, as for the game itself, there's a story about the world coming to an end and a girl deciding she's going to collect as much stuff as she can before that happens, seemingly with some weird marionette creation that she's controlling, but even the developers don't take this seriously and are just as dismissive of it as everyone else will be. It's pretty much forgotten about just as quickly as it's introduced and used only as a vague excuse to justify the gameplay, which is what this is really all about.

You'll start off as a small, nebulous cloud of tiny, white spheres in vague humanoid arrangement, then gradually absorb small items that you come into contact with, everyday objects like fruit or cans or gummy bears. The more you collect, the bigger you grow, and the bigger you grow, the larger the items you are able to absorb. To begin with you'll only be a few inches high, but by the end of the game you'll be gathering up entire buildings. It's a really satisfying sense of progression you get when an object you were previously bouncing off and being completely dwarfed by, is now a miniscule triviality stuck on the side of your leg.

In each stage you'll have a few minutes to gather up as much as you can and earn a rating at the end, getting a high enough rating in select stages will then unlock further ones for 12 in total (plus 2 additional hidden stages). The short time limit and small stage number makes this game pretty easy to get into for quick blasts of fun, but the downside is it makes the full asking price a little hard to swallow, doubly so given how slapdash and primitive everything looks. It really does look like a game from the 64bit era, maybe with one or two exceptions as later stages introduce new art styles that have a little bit more finesse to them... but only just. I feel like that's part of its charm, though, that it's intentionally bad looking and really not taking itself seriously, given that you're a weird cloud man with benches and dogs and people stuck to him. But if you're a graphics nut, this will likely offend your eyes and cause your ocular nerves great distress and you should probably go elsewhere. Although, if you do that you will be missing out on some great music, which is a much greater step-up in quality over anything you'll see in the game.

If you can pick it up on sale for a price that matches the otherwise cheap and cheerful nature of everything else here, then there's a lot of fun to be had for the hour or two it'll take you to finish. But really, having a blimp for a head or a skyscraper for a leg or becoming a walking ball of panicked people never gets old and is reason enough to try it. If this is really what the end of the world will look like, then roll on, Armageddon!
Var denna recension hjälpsam? Ja Nej Rolig
1 av 1 personer (100%) fann denna recension hjälpsam
1.3 timmar totalt
Upplagd: 10 januari
Like a slightly worse Katamari Damacy.

---Pros: Sucking up objects is super fun and satisfying, three modes for each level (including a notime limit mode), lots of unique sets, a nice array of music with variety and generally pretty good.

---Cons: Gamepad support is implemented badly (using a steam controller fixes it), no graphical objects, noticeably framerate drops, and a camera that is just a little too touchy, resulting in jerky movement.

Overall, the only real problems I have with this game are the technical ones, but just sucking up everything in an enviornment is really fun and enjoyable. It's decent and if you think from the trailer that it looks fun, you should get it on sale.
Var denna recension hjälpsam? Ja Nej Rolig
3 av 6 personer (50%) fann denna recension hjälpsam
0.1 timmar totalt
Upplagd: 8 december, 2015
After reading the writeups for this game I had a lot of hopes for it. A simple back-story, vaguely familiar gameplay, and a quirky nature that should have made it a fun game.

Unfortunately, I was quite a fan of Katamari Damacy back in the day... and a few levels into the game I found myself just pining for the original. The movement in this game feels twitchy in comparison (Your pickup radius doesn't increase in size, for example) and doesn't have the same ambience as Katamari.

Overall, I think this game could be a great and fun introduction to a style of game that was unique but is unavailable on PC, but I can't recommend it to existing fans of the genre.
Var denna recension hjälpsam? Ja Nej Rolig