A Dark Presence stalks the small town of Bright Falls, pushing Alan Wake to the brink of sanity in his fight to unravel the mystery and save his love.
User reviews: Very Positive (8,191 reviews)
Release Date: Feb 16, 2012

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Includes 2 items: Alan Wake, Alan Wake Collector's Edition Extras

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Includes 3 items: Alan Wake's American Nightmare, Alan Wake, Alan Wake Collector's Edition Extras

 

Recommended By Curators

"You use a flash light to scare off the spoky. It's a better port than most games."

Reviews

“Remedy's done a great job of mixing elements of written work, television, and video games to create an experience full of scares, laughs, and thrills that's just as fun to play as it is to watch.”
9/10 – http://pc.ign.com/articles/121/1218682p1.html

Steam Big Picture

About This Game

When the wife of the best-selling writer Alan Wake disappears on their vacation, his search turns up pages from a thriller he doesn’t even remember writing. A Dark Presence stalks the small town of Bright Falls, pushing Wake to the brink of sanity in his fight to unravel the mystery and save his love.

Presented in the style of a TV series, Alan Wake features the trademark Remedy storytelling and pulse-pounding action sequences. As players dive deeper and deeper into the mystery, they’ll face overwhelming odds, plot twists, and cliffhangers. It’s only by mastering the Fight With Light combat mechanic that they can stay one step ahead of the darkness that spreads across Bright Falls.

With the body of an action game and the mind of a psychological thriller, Alan Wake’s intense atmosphere, deep and multilayered story, and exceptionally tense combat sequences provide players with an entertaining and original gaming experience.

Enhanced for the PC

  • Includes Alan Wake Special Episodes “The Signal” and “The Writer”
  • Experience Alan Wake’s Pacific Northwest in higher resolutions and higher fidelity than the Xbox360 version.
  • Fully configurable mouse and keyboard support, or if you prefer to play with the Microsoft gamepad connected to your PC, you can do that too!
  • Lots of customizable graphics settings and support for 4:3, 16:9 and 16:10 aspect ratios!
  • Multithreaded engine that takes advantage of quad core CPUs.
  • Additional features our fans have sought after such as field of view adjustment as well as “hide HUD”.
  • Works with AMD Eyefinity 3D 3-screen mode.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP SP2
    • Processor: Dual Core 2GHz Intel or 2.8GHz AMD
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: DirectX 10 compatible with 512MB RAM
    • DirectX®: 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 8 GB HD space
    • Sound: DirectX 9.0c compatible
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: Quad Core 2.66GHz Intel or 3.2GHz AMD
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: DirectX 10 compatible or later with 1GB RAM
    • DirectX®: 10
    • Hard Drive: 8 GB HD space
    • Sound: DirectX 9.0c compatible
Helpful customer reviews
69 of 81 people (85%) found this review helpful
17.1 hrs on record
INTRODUCTION:
Alan Wake is a survival horror third person shooter developed by Remedy Entertainment on the Xbox 360 in 2010 which slowly made its way to the PC 2 years later. It only took 48 hours for the game to surpass the development cost after their PC release.

You play as (duh) Alan Wake, a writer who channels Stephen King, who, while on vacation with his wife in a sleepy mountain town, soon find themselves in the center of a supernatural phenomenon that threatens to engulf the town in darkness.

PROS:
+ Combat: - The combat in itself is not original since it plays like your regular Resident Evil third person shooter, however, it does spice things up by making all the enemies invulnerable until you strip away the 'darkness' that protects them using any source of light (flashlight, torch, flares etc.)

+ Atmosphere: - The town and the surrounding mountains and forest are dark, mysterious, foreboding and generally hostile. Not a great place for a vacation but a great place for a survival horror action game. Great lighting is what really made the atmosphere stand out.

+ Story: - (Also a CON, see below) The game boast a good story line that keeps players wondering what's going to happen next with its unique story telling mechanic. The mystery is deep and the characters within it are well written.

+ Sound: - This would normally go to Atmosphere but I think it deserve its own bullet point. Voice Acting is great, sound effects are well implemented and the musical score are suited to the general theme.

CONS:
- Horrendous Facial Animations: - The character models are good, textures are nice, but the lip syncing and general facial animations are awkward and painful to look at.

- Story: - (Also a PRO, see above) If the player has ever read a Stephen King book or seen a movie with a Stephen King book as its basis, then you can easily see where this game HEAVILY takes its inspiration. So heavy in fact that it can be seen as unoriginal.

- Too Much Forest: - This is kind of a personal gripe I have with the game. It has way too much forest sequences that makes me kinda hate nature. The forest sequences are nicely done, but if repeated way to many times, it looses its charm.

CONCLUSION:
GREAT GAME. If you're looking for a third person Survival Horror experience and you're one of the disappointed Resident Evil fans, then Alan Wake is a good alternative. It delivers a clever new mechanic to the third person shooting aspect that does not involve chest high walls or massive explosions. Though the re-playability might not be great, Alan Wake still brings a lengthy adventure that makes your money's worth.
Posted: June 25
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50 of 63 people (79%) found this review helpful
42.7 hrs on record
Let's get one thing out of the way: If you're a creative type, especially a writer of any persuasion, Alan Wake is worth a playthrough just for the subject matter, namely the nature of dreams, the unconscious, and the creative process, and how they are all tied up in each other. Any professional fiction writer will tell you that they often don't know where their "ideas" come from -- they might as well just come straight out of the proverbial ether, and to anyone else it sounds like superstitious mumbo-jumbo. But the truth is, it often really does come out of left field, left field being that ocean of subconscious impulses and images that is constantly roiling in everyone's heads. A writer's job is paying attention to those images when they do show up, when most people can comfortably ignore them, and that makes it a tricky business. That's the gist of what Alan Wake deals with, and if anything, it's worth it to see what the game devs have to say about it.

Is it a GOOD story? Well. That is entirely up to your interpretation of the events in the game. And I'll mostly leave it at that. I'll give some of my impressions in no particular order: If you like the show LOST, you'll like this. If you like David Lynch's stuff, you will like this, particularly for some of the music and very obvious homages to things like Twin Peaks, Blue Velvet and perhaps Lost Highway. That is to say, if you want things to make sense in a linear way, forget it. It's actually a little bittersweet to play through this if you are a big fan of Lynch, because while Alan Wake is very very obviously a love letter to the "weird stuff happening in a little town" genre, and it really does nail some of the spooky imagery that Lynch is known for, the characters and the dialogue fall disappointingly flat. It's a very rough imitation of the unforgettable dialogue of Twin Peaks, Blue Velvet, etc. I can't fault them that much for that, because at least they tried. Enough of that.

Gameplay is pretty technically tight with satisfying, challenging gunplay mixed up with light-source mechanics -- you weaken things with your flashlight, and then blast them. It's fun and keeps you on the edge of your seat most of the time. But, and this just may be my low tolerance for the same damn thing over and over, there are many times later in the game where you wish you could just get it over with. The pacing is a little annoying and predictable at times; when you would appreciate a chance to just wander around in the more story-oriented areas, suddenly you're back in the gauntlet of enemies running through the nighttime forest. And there is a LOT of nighttime forest. You've never seen so many trees! But they certainly look pretty. One of my biggest gripes would have to be the fact that the game occasionally does not follow its own rules, which inevitably leads to some frustrating reloads. The enemies will sometimes cheap-shot you, for example falling on you while you're in the middle of opening a chest; most of the time you cannot break out of certain "cinematic" moments fast enough and it will screw you fairly mercilessly. Thankfully reload times are fast and the checkpoints for the most part are plentiful and logical. Just minor annoyances when it comes down to it.

It's a fun ride for the most part. I wish I could say that "this is, excuse me, a damn fine cup of coffee," but for several reasons it's just a pretty good cup of joe. You take what you can get, though!
Posted: April 26
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36 of 43 people (84%) found this review helpful
22.7 hrs on record
Alan Wake is an episodic psychological-thriller action game that follows the titular author on his 'vacation' to the fictional Pacific Northwest town of Bright Falls. Alan has fallen on hard times, after writing his very successful Alex Casey crime-drama series, he hasn't been able to write another book for the last two years, and has become far more well-known for his violent out-lashes at the press. He and his wife, Alice, are hoping to get away from it all, away from the bustling city of New York that they're accustomed too to the small and peaceful Washington town ... However, this goes terribly wrong after a series of odd occurrences at their resting cabin ends up with Alan waking up a week later with no memory of what happened in the last week, his wife missing, and strange shadow people coming after him in the darkness of the woods.

Alan Wake at its best is an immersive trip both into the rather colorful and well-realized town of Bright Falls, and the more sinister and campy lurkings that pull from everything from Stephen King to Lovecraft to David Lynch. At its worst its a repetitive combat game where you'll often get lost in the woods.

Maybe more appropriately stated is that Alan Wake is a huge love it/hate it game. There are elements of Alan Wake that it pulls off beautifully, while other elements wear rather thin over its course. Honestly how much you enjoy the game deals completely in how grand you enjoy what it does right, and how much you can deal with what it does wrong.

Alan Wake is a rather gorgeous game. It has fantastic art direction, a well-done lighting system, matched with fantastic optimization for PC and probably some of the best realized forest settings and night lighting realized in games. Its visual flair suffers a bit from some weird facial animations from the characters, but during sections of the game where you stand on mountains overlooking a valley below full of details, it can be kind of breath-taking. Bright Falls feels like a real-place, and the way they connect everything and how it all fits together as an overall map is impressive. It does feel like a vibrant, lived-in place often during the daytime sections of gameplay where you get to explore and take everything in.

It also has a very elegant soundtrack to it. The compositions really switch between three tones; beautiful symphonic pieces for the more relaxing and emotional scenes of the game, low-keyed and sometimes a bit sinister down-time music to match exploration and dreary environments, and rather thunderous 'struggle' music of when the action gets going. From this, the beautiful symphonic pieces definitely stand-out, but none of it is really bad. On-top of this, a variety of licensed songs have been chosen for the game, which play on radios and during episode endings. And sound-design is rather top-notch, with atmospheric forestry sounds, creaks in rustic homes, and little sounds that really help make the atmosphere and world. The sounds of shining light on enemies, shooting your gun, and your flashlight turning on, are all also suitably satisfying.

The gameplay of Alan Wake is really split into two modes; Exploration mode, where you're in a location without enemies with a variety of small tasks you can do, both for progression and for fun, and Night Time, when often you're isolated and alone (or with someone who you question how long they're going to last) as monsters come out at you from the woods. The night time takes up probably about 80% of the game, while exploration mode happens about 20% of the time.

The combat system is fairly simple, though with a few tricks to it. Enemies are covered in shadows which make them invincible to bullets, so the first goal is to disperse the shadows with your light. You can focus-down a strong beam of light that will chip more at the shadows of an enemy, but rapidly consumes battery power, or do a normal light, which does a lot less damage to Taken but slowly recharges the battery. If you use up a battery, it will go out and be off for about 10 seconds, unless you put in a new battery, but of which come in limited supplies. You can also use light to also stun enemies by flashing them with a strong beam quickly, which is useful if you decide to flee rather than fight. The guns feel rather samey, but you also get flashbang grenades, which will kill in one-hit weaker enemies and damage stronger ones, and flares, which you can light to ward-off enemies or deplete at their shadows.

Alan's final form of dealing with Taken is to flee from encounters, but this can be a bit tricky at first. Alan has very limited sprinting (he'll tire out after about 15 seconds and lower his pace to a light jog), and the enemies can catch-up to you without some intervention. The real art of fleeing in Alan Wake isn't just running, but to manage your stamina meter (it's better to stop before you tire-out to recharge it than letting it run out), and managing the enemies with your light by briefly flashing a strong light on them to stun them for a few moments.

All-in-all, it can be satisfying, but as the game goes on it can also be fairly repetitive. There's only about seven types of enemies through the course of the game, and three of them are rather similar. The limited selection and the amount of times you face the enemies can be a bit tiring.

Also a good portion of the game is set in forests., especially early on. The game throws you into a lot of forests where if you're not good at keeping direction in mind or marking landmarks, it can get very easy to get lost.

But there is some good mix-up here. A variety of set-pieces and moments lay littered through the adventure to help break the tedium of combat, ranging from atmospheric and moody caverns, stage show showdowns, a variety of exploration and daytime sections, police chases, car driving segments, and more. In some parts of the game you won't be fighting alone, and notably during Episodes 4 and 5 especially, they tread you away from the forests to much more interesting locations.

Alan Wake may test on some gamers patience, but there is also a lot to love here. The characters are colorful, and through the game's course are very easy to like. Optional side-stuff, including interesting radio broadcasts and black-and-white Twilight Zone parodies you can watch on televisions through the world are enjoyable.

There are a total of 8 episodes in Alan Wake, and to beat them all should take you somewhere between 12-24 hours. The breaking point for many comes during Episode 3, which is notably the longest episode in the whole game, and with less story developments than most of the other episodes as well.

On a personal level, I really enjoyed Alan Wake. It has flaws, the biggest one being repetition, but the overall package I found to be immersive, to have enjoyable TV-show like gameplay segments (fun characters, cliffhangers, location design), and I got rather wrapped up in the story and world of the game. There's stand-out moments in gameplay, and I can honestly say there is no other game quite like Alan Wake. While it pulls from a lot of sources, it manages to be unlike any other game, and quite unique.

But there is drudgery here, and if you're less a fan of camp, world-building, and more dragged down by repetition of combat, you may very well not enjoy your trip to Bright Falls. To some, the game comes off as a mediocre game with flashes of brilliance that it unfortunately does not ever quite live up too.

Alan Wake will either strike with you or will not, a rather polarizing game. However, if you're a fan of horror authors, television programs like Twin Peaks or Happy Town, or want a believable Pacific Northwest setting, this may do you in.
Posted: May 18
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11 of 12 people (92%) found this review helpful
14.7 hrs on record
A succesful writer, Alan Wake, decides to go to Bright Falls to get inspiration for his next book. He hasn't managed to get a word on paper for almost 2 years. The idea however wasn't for Alan to actually write there, he needed some time off.
When his wife Alice tell him she has a suprise for him, he gets excited. The suprise however did not turn out to be a good one, Alice showed him a typewriter, Alan gets furious, and goes outside to cool down. When he looks up, he sees the lights switch off in the study where he and Alice where just moments ago, followed by a terrifying scream. A second goes by, and all of the sudden he sees something drag Alice from the balcony into the water. He doesn't think, and jumps in the water.
He wakes up in his car, for after what seems just to be a moment later. The citizens of Bright Falls that have gone missing over the years try to kill him, but they're not just regular citizens. Something dark and evil has taken possesion of them, making them almost unable to be killed. The dark smoke that surrounds them protects them from everything vulnerable to them, except for one crucial thing. Light. Lucky for Alan, he owns a flashlight, and he isn't afraid to use it. He finds a revolver, and manages to find a way to kill these dark inhabitans of Bright Falls. In his journeys he comes across so called 'manuscriptpages', pages from a book he apparently wrote...

This is just the beginning of the great game called; Alan Wake. It's storyline is so good and at the same time so terrifying, you might actually fall off your chair when playing this game. The many characters you come across in your travels through Bright Falls shows that the creators really did their best when the made this game. I find this story suitable for an actual book, my favorite writer Stephen King would approve this. The money you pay for this game might even be not enough, this game will suck you up just like a good book does. You get so involved with the characters and environment that you need to pinch your arm ones or twice before you go back to the real world. This game is defenitly a must-play.
Posted: August 15
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7 of 8 people (88%) found this review helpful
10.2 hrs on record
This game it's like playing and writing a book at the same time. Extremely interesting and amazingly done.

This is a psychological horror game, you go through the storyline trying to look for your wife and killing shadows with a flashlight while trying to remember things that happened.

Alan Wake is one of the best awesome scripts I've ever seen and that's why I tell you it's like reading a book.

Let's talk about gameplay


+ Good graphics
+ Good gameplay
+ Xbox 360 controller support
+ Voice acting is just flawless


- Camera can be weird even glitchy at times
- The enemies are so repetitive
- So repetitive.


But, I'd recommend you to get it! :D
Posted: July 15
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405 of 446 people (91%) found this review helpful
10.1 hrs on record
Steam reports that I have only three hours in this game. Well, Steam and I are going to have to disagree on that. I own the physical collector's edition for the Xbox. I've beaten the game twice. I've bought multiple copies for friends. Alan Wake was the reason I purchased an Xbox 360 in the first place, and when it hit on PC, I bought the Digital Collector's Edition on Day one. I've sunk a lot of time into the game, and thought about it for a great deal more.

I love this game.

If you try to play it like the average person plays a shooter, you might not have a lot of fun. Alan Wake's not meant to be played 'normally,' it's meant to be played WELL. Shooters are games about controlling space; quite a few people have the mistaken impression that a shooter is about pointing at a thing on screen and clicking until it dies. With Alan Wake, it takes longer to click until something dies, so people get upset and think that Alan Wake is, in fact, a bad game. But that couldn't be further from the truth.

At its core, Alan Wake is a strategic action game. The point is to use the beam of light to manage the distance between enemies and yourself while taking them down. Light keeps them at a distance while burning off their armor. In the most desperate fights in the game, you've got to run a healthy balance between focusing on one guy to destroy his armor and keeping the light shined on everyone else to keep them at bay so you can take down one guy at a time. This strategic play ultimately slows down the pace of the game while ratcheting up the tension. It's super clever.

The story's great, by the way. You might think it's schlocky, but that's kinda the point: the game's aping the quirky, occasionally bad writing of psychological horror stories, and it does a superb job at it. Instead of trying to be great literature, Alan Wake tries to fit within its genre, and it does a fantastic job! You've got to be willing to be part of the game's peculiar quiddity, but if you do, it'll reward you.

Visually and aurally, it's a stunning experience. Even if the gameplay weren't top-notch, I'd still go back to Alan Wake time and time again. Simply being there, in its world, is fascinating. Remedy crafts its moments so well that some of them are ingrained in my head. Listening to Pat Maine on the radio, shooting monsters on a stage while The Old Guards of Asgod blast away on the speakers, getting your first flares... it's great.

Alan Wake is great.

Seriously, buy it. Play it. Have fun!
Posted: December 12, 2013
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